Dec2010 Volume 1‎ > ‎

Endure August





When we think of the word stress, most of us think of emotional stress simply because we are so familiar with it.  Surveys of the American public report that three quarters of all adults experience “great stress” weekly.  






Some of us are also quite familiar with physical stress.  After a period of time, prolonged physical stress contributes to the emotional stress.  “Why does my back hurt?  When will it stop?  I can’t do that because of my pain...”  Prolonged emotional stress forces the body’s hormonal response (namely cortisol and DHEA) to become unbalanced.  



How do we weave in coping mechanisms that quiet the stress and the emotions?  Enter the concept “ENDURE”.  



Although it may take some hunting, in most cases there is some form of exercise that each of us can do, regardless of a physical limitation.  If your knees or back limit you, try a non-impact exercise (elliptical, swimming, etc.)  If your shoulders hurt when you lift weights, up your cardio.  Exercise, and all of the endorphins released as a result, calm you and allow your natural levels of the feel-good hormone, DHEA, to increase.  



It is completely understood that when you are hurting (physically or emotionally), the last thing you want to do may be exercise.  However, your body was built to move.  Sometimes, just “getting moving” can give you some relief.  Experts recommend that your efforts be put into starting the exercise each day.  Specifically, convince yourself to walk to the end of the road and back.  When you get to the end of the road, and you’re feeling decent, push it to the next corner.  In this way, you have achieved what you set out to do and even surpassed your original destination.  Let the stressful stimulus disappear and the DHEA be released.  




The DHEA will promote better sleep, repair tissues, keep your immune system strong and help lower your LDL (bad cholesterol).  This benefit package is a solid reason to endure again tomorrow.  So, start again.  And again the following day.  Eventually your endurance will win and your persistence will pay off in bigger and more noticeable ways.     


 
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